What Is a Custom Case Study

A custom case study is an in-depth study of one person, group, or event. In a custom case study, nearly every aspect of the subject’s life and history is analyzed to seek patterns and causes of behavior. Custom case studies can be used in a variety of fields including psychology, medicine, education, anthropology, political science, and social work.

The hope is that learning gained from studying one case can be generalized to many others. Unfortunately, case studies tend to be highly subjective and it is sometimes difficult to generalize results to a larger population.

While case studies focus on a single individual or group, they follow a format that is similar to other types of psychology writing. If you are writing a custom case study, it is important to follow the rules of APA format. From here you can buy custom case study.

Benefits and Limitations

A custom case study can have both strengths and weaknesses. Researchers must consider these pros and cons before deciding if this type of study is appropriate for their needs.

One of the greatest advantages of a custom case study is that it allows researchers to investigate things that are often difficult to impossible to replicate in a lab. Some other benefits of a custom case study:

  • Allows researchers to collect a great deal of information
  • Give researchers the chance to collect information on rare or unusual cases
  • Allows researchers to develop hypotheses that can be explored in experimental research

On the negative side, a custom case study:

  • Cannot necessarily be generalized to the larger population
  • Cannot demonstrate cause and effect
  • May not be scientifically rigorous
  • Can lead to bias

Researchers may choose to perform a custom case study if they are interested in exploring a unique or recently discovered phenomenon. The insights gained from such research can then help the researchers develop additional ideas and study questions that might then be explored in future studies.

Custom Case Study Examples

There have been a number of notable case studies in the history of psychology. Much of Freud’s work and theories were developed through the use of individual case studies. Some great examples of case studies in psychology include:

  • Anna O: Anna O. was a pseudonym of a woman named Bertha Pappenheim, a patient of a physician named Josef Breuer. While she was never a patient of Freud’s, Freud and Breuer discussed her case extensively. The woman was experiencing symptoms of a condition that was then known as hysteria and found that talking about her problems helped relieve her symptoms. Her case played an important part in the development of talk therapy as an approach to mental health treatment.
  • Phineas Gage: Phineas Gage was a railroad employee who experienced a terrible accident in which an explosion sent a metal rod through his skull, damaging important portions of his brain. Gage recovered from his accident but was left with serious changes in both personality and behavior.
  • Genie: Genie was a young girl subjected to horrific abuse and isolation. The custom case study of Genie allowed researchers to study whether language could be taught even after critical periods for language development had been missed. Her case also served as an example of how scientific research may interfere with treatment and lead to further abuse of vulnerable individuals.

Such cases demonstrate how case research can be used to study things that researchers could not replicate in experimental settings. In Genie’s case, her horrific abuse had denied her the opportunity to learn language at critical points in her development.

Types

There are a few different types of custom case studies that psychologists and other researchers might utilize:

  • Collective case studies: These involve studying a group of individuals. Researchers might study a group of people in a certain setting or look at an entire community of people.
  • Descriptive case studies: These involve starting with a descriptive theory. The subjects are then observed and the information gathered is compared to the pre-existing theory.
  • Explanatory case studies: These are often used to do causal investigations. In other words, researchers are interested in looking at factors that may have actually caused certain things to occur.
  • Exploratory case studies: These are sometimes used as a prelude to further, more in-depth research. This allows researchers to gather more information before developing their research questions and hypotheses.
  • Instrumental case studies: These occur when the individual or group allows researchers to understand more than what is initially obvious to observers.
  • Intrinsic case studies: This type of custom case study is when the researcher has a personal interest in the case. Jean Piaget’s observations of his own children are good examples of how an intrinsic custom case study can contribute to the development of a psychological theory.